Can Chickens Eat Loquats?

The loquat is an evergreen shrub that was originally grown in China.

But, of late, you will literally find loquat shrubs and trees all across the globe.

If you have ample loquat trees growing abundantly in your backyard and your chickens love to free-range in the backyard, too, then you might wonder

Can Chickens Eat Loquats?

Yes, chickens can and will eat loquats or almost anything you put before your chicken.

It is perfectly safe for your chickens to eat loquats as there are no toxins to be found in loquats.

But, loquats are a fruit that is relatively high in sugar.

Hence, it would be best to take care of how many loquats your chickens eat.

So, let’s take an in-depth look into chickens eating loquats and whether or not loquats have any health benefits that can serve to be advantageous for chickens.

What Are Loquats?

Can Chickens Eat Loquats?

As mentioned earlier, loquat scrubs are evergreen and can be found worldwide from Spain all the way to Australia.

Loquats are slightly different from other fruit trees as they sprout flowers in autumn, and the loquat fruit is ready to eat by early spring.

Now, the fruit itself has a rounded shape much like a pear, and the flesh of a loquat has a tangy-sweet flavor.

Loquats are used in fruit salads, jams, jellies, and chutneys.

But, loquats are used for other purposes such as making alcohol, animal feed, and curing vomiting and excessive thirst—the Chinese use loquats to treat coughs, diabetes, and even cancer.

Are Loquats Safe For Chickens To Eat?

Yes, loquats are safe for chickens.

You see, the loquat fruit is perfectly safe for humans, and as the fruit contains no toxic that can harm your chicken, it is entirely safe for your flock of chickens too.

But, loquat is a fruit that is relatively high in sugar.

Which mean excessive sugar in chickens can lead to all kinds of health problems.

Hence, it would help if you took care only to offer loquats to chickens as an occasional treat.

In most cases, chickens love to peck on many things during their daily foraging.

So, even if you have a loquat tree in your backyard and there is an abundance of the loquat fruit lying around, it’s likely that your chicken will be gorging on the insect and seeds that accumulate around the loquat tree.

Nonetheless, if you plan to feed loquat to your chickens, then you need to make sure that you remove the huge pit inside the fruit before you feed your chicken.

It is also essential that you never provide your chicken a loquat or any fruit or that matter that has any traces of pesticide or chemical compound.

What Are The Health Benefits Of Feeding Loquats To Chickens?

While it is true that loquats are high in sugar, however, loquat is a healthy fruit for humans and chickens alike.

You see, loquats also have a high content of carotenoid antioxidants. Loquats, also known as the Japanese plum, contain beta carotene. 

Beta carotene is an antioxidant known for its ability to fight off degenerative diseases and boost cell generation.

Loquat is an excellent source of vitamin A as well.

These nutrients can help reduce the risk of colorectal, lung, and other cancers.

Antioxidant beta carotene also enhances the immunity of the body.

The better the body’s immunity, the more the body becomes capable of fighting off illnesses and diseases.

The leaves and fruit of loquat contain triterpene acid, a substance that reduces inflammation.

The Chinese have used loquat leaves for centuries to cure diseases caused by inflammation such as bronchitis and asthma.

Loquats contain flavonoids. Flavonoids can significantly minimize the effects of oxidative stress.

The consumption of dietary flavonoids prevents cardiovascular diseases and cognitive diseases like Alzheimer’s and dementia.

If you think that too much loquat will make your chickens gain weight due to the high sugars, you are mistaken.

Yes, loquats have quite a bit of sugar, but this amazing fruit has a very low caloric content. 

Can Chicks Eat Loquats?

You will be surprised by the number of chicken owners who vouch that their chickens eat loquats and gain many health benefits from consuming this fruit.

But, when it comes to a chick, you must realize that you are dealing with a different set of rules altogether.

You see, chicks don’t have the same dietary needs as adult chickens.

Chicks need more protein than mature chickens.

They have very sensitive digestive systems that aren’t developed enough to digest a fruit as complex as the loquat.

It is not advised that you feed loquats to chicks under five weeks of age. 

Final Words

Many chicken owners prefer to err on the side of caution and keep their chickens well away from loquats or another high in sugar fruit such as mangoes or melons.

Yet, it is also a fruit that is low on protein and fiber.

But, when you consider the other nutritional value that loquats can add to your chicken’s diet, indeed, many chicken owners start to sing a different tune.

There’s no denying that loquats are readily available and in abundance. Loquats are a wholesome fruit for humans and most animals as it does not contain any toxins that can harm most animal species.

However, it is crucial to remember that loquat is a fruit that should be given to your chicken as an occasional treat.

Loquat should never be a part of your chicken’s regular diet. 

When you do serve your chicken a loquat, you should make an effort to remove the seed before you offer it to your flock of chickens.

Moreover, if you are in the habit of using pesticides to limit the insect population in your garden, don’t spray any on your fruit trees, particularly when you plan to use loquats from your loquat tree as a treat for your chickens.

 

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