Chicken Not Leaving Coop

Chickens normally love doing their everyday runs, foraging the ground to look for any food, and even bathing in the sunlight.

Every day, chickens have routines and they will always be excited to get out of their coop to start a wonderful day.

But what if… a chicken refuses to leave its coop? 

No matter how safe, comfortable, and warm a chicken coop is, chickens will still have to leave it to do their daily routines.

So what could be the possible reason a chicken not leaving the coop?

There will be instances where a chicken will not leave its shelter due to many possible reasons.

It can be because of cold weather and your chicken is cold; it may be a new chicken that is not yet familiar with the surroundings yet, and the chicken may be sick, afraid, or is being bullied by the other members of the flock. 

Let’s get into more detail in this article

Carry on reading!

4 Possible Reasons Chicken Staying In The Coop?

Chickens may choose to stay inside the coop and here’s a couple of possible reasons why: 

1. Weather Is Cold 

Coops are generally made to keep the entire flock warm, especially during cold seasons.

However, there will always be a time when the weather is really cold for them.

Usually, a chicken may just stay inside the coop for warmth. 

This may happen of course during the winter season

2. It’s a New Or Young Chicken 

While the majority of the chickens will get overly excited to run in the field, young chickens and even the new ones may still stay inside the coop.

This is completely because these fowls are still trying to familiarize themselves with the environment and are still trying to learn the routine of others.

3. Your Chicken Is Scared

Coops are also built for protection for your chickens 

This is the place where your flock feels safe and protected from predators such as hawks or eagles

It is possible that your chicken saw a predator or is generally scared of something such as bullying from the other members, hence its refusal to leave the shelter.

Related articles you may find interesting

Chicken staying away from flock 

When do hawks hunt chickens?

4. Your Chicken Is Sick

Chickens will not leave the coop simply because it does not have any energy to do so.

It is possible that your chicken is sick or is suffering from an injury.

Have a read of my article – Chickens afraid to leave coop

Why Is My Chicken Just Sitting There? (Should I Be Worried?)

It is perfectly normal for chickens to sit down from time to time.

It may be just taking a quick rest, sunbathing, or just wanting to relax.

However, if you think that there is a problem – such as it is sitting quite frequently or maybe it does not stand up at all, then should you be worried? 

There is a huge chance that your chicken is a broody hen.

Broody hens are chickens that have surging hormones and will sit down in an attempt to hatch its eggs.

In other words, your chicken is sitting down for egg hatching. 

This is regardless of whether there is really an egg or a clutch to hatch.

Some chickens may sit down to hatch a phantom egg, even.

As long as there is a present rooster, this is a high-likely scenario to happen.

Another reason why your chicken is just sitting there is sickness.

Your fowl may be suffering from an illness or injury, especially if it does not really seem to be in its normal condition.

You should observe your fowl for any more possible symptoms. 

I go into more detail in my article – Chicken keeps sitting down 

Do Chickens Need To Be Let Out Every Day? 

It is highly suggested to let your chickens go outside everyday, except during the winter season where it can get really cold.

It is not wrong to keep them inside the coop all day, but it will not give the best benefits that your flock may gain from going outside.

After all, chickens thrive best when they get to run outside in the field, doing their routines – sunbathing, dustbathing, foraging, and other chicken activities.

If you want a healthy chicken and even quality eggs in the future, it is best to let your chickens out everyday for a certain time, preferably morning.

However, if you’re worried about predators, having a chicken run may still be enough for your flock to be happy, while being safe. 

How Long Can Chickens Stay Outside? 

Honestly It actually depends on your availability and preference

Some chicken owners let their chickens out as long as there is daylight.

They let the chickens go outside for an entire day, and just open the door of their coop, so they could go back on their own.

After all, chickens know when to go home because they perfectly know the danger of being outside in the dark.

There is no specific recommended and definite time for the outdoor activities of chickens, as long as it is day, it is good for them to stay outside. 

Because on top of giving a ton of happiness and freedom to your flock, you are also giving them health benefits, particularly vitamin D.

This vitamin is essential in keeping the overall health of your fowls healthy.

Wrapping Up

Chickens may refuse to leave their coops because your fowls might be cold, scared of predators, still unfamiliar with the surroundings, are being picked on, or just because they are sick.

No matter what the reason is, help them as best as you can especially if it involves their health.

Fowls do well outside; they will be happier and healthier when they get to do their daily activities in the field.

While you can keep them inside their coop all day, it will undoubtedly affect their health and egg production.

It is recommended just to let them outside until there is daylight.

After all, chickens will go back inside their coop on their own once it starts to get dark. 

 

 

 

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