My Parrot Nose Is Bleeding!

Your parrot’s nose is bleeding, and you’re worried. 

Bleeding can be a symptom of many different illnesses in birds, so it’s essential to figure out the underlying cause. 

What you do next will be determined by the severity of the bleeding and your bird’s other symptoms.

If your bird has a nosebleed and is otherwise showing no signs of illness, it may be an allergy to something like feathers or dust.

If this is the case, make sure their cage is clean and that they’re not overburdened with too much activity. 

However, if your parrot’s nose is bleeding because it has been pecking at its own face (a standard behavior), then there may be something wrong. 

This blog post will answer the My parrot nose is bleeding; what should I do?” in detail. 

Here’s what you’re going to discover

  • Why Is My Parrot’s Nose Bleeding? Here Are Some Possible Reasons
  • What Do I Do If My Bird’s Nose Is Bleeding?
  • How Long Should I Wait Until I Contact My Veterinarian?
  • Why Do Parrots Bleed from the Nose?
  • What should I do if my bird has a nosebleed?

Sound good?

Let’s get started!

(Please note – this is no medical advice, always contact your avian vet or if you think it’s serious take your parrot to the avian vet) 

Why Is My Parrot’s Nose Bleeding? Here Are Some Possible Reasons 

Bleeding can be a symptom of many different illnesses in birds. 

If your parrot has a nosebleed and is otherwise showing no signs of illness, it may be an allergy to something like feathers or dust.

If this is the case, make sure their cage is clean and that they’re not overburdened with too much activity. 

There are many reasons why your parrot might have nosebleeds.

The most common cause is that the blood is coming from a nasal passage.

This could be from an old wound or an infection.

Nosebleeds can also be a sign of trauma to the area of injury. 

Your bird might also have a nasal discharge in the form of a discharge mucus.

Sometimes this will have blood in it. 

Other times it will be clear.

Even if your bird does have a nasal discharge, it may not be able to put its finger in its nose to remove the blood from it.

Instead, he may rub the nose-bleed all over his cage walls or other surfaces, which can result in a much bigger nosebleed.

Most parrot species will react similarly to nasal damage. They will have a lot of drooling and will act much more agitated than usual.

It is essential for your bird not to remove its drool. 

If their drool gets into their wounds, this can cause infections and severe tissue damage.

If they start to yowl or try to eat the saliva, seek medical attention immediately.

If you notice that your parrot is not acting as usual, it’s a good idea to contact a trained behaviorist. 

A sudden, intense and forceful blow to the bird’s nose can result in bleeding that can be pretty severe. 

Often, when a bird shows symptoms of severe disease, it’s due to an external cause. 

These external factors can be carried into the home on shoes, clothing, blankets, etc.  

However, this is the exception to the rule. 

It is implausible that a parrot would develop bleeding under the conjunctiva of its eye because of an internal problem. 

Instead, it is far more likely that a large animal or even a human, who has put sand or other foreign matter under the bird’s eye, may have done so and caused the bleeding.

If your bird is sneezing or has a runny nose, it is probably from a secondary infection, such as a bacterial or fungal infection. 

When this happens, the body’s immune system tries to combat this by secreting white blood cells, which looks like clear or brownish discharge.  

In any case, contacting your vet is crucial. 

What Do I Do If My Bird’s Nose Is Bleeding?

There’s really no sure way to diagnose a parrot’s bleeding. 

So what should you do if your bird has a nosebleed? 

Of course, the first thing you should do is see if your bird has any obvious symptoms, like bleeding from the eyes, mouth or nose. 

If so, call your avian veterinary doctor to make an appointment for a test or to take a look into the potential causes. 

The sooner a sick or injured bird can be examined and treated the better.

If your bird’s nose is bleeding but doesn’t look or feel abnormal, your best bet is to contact your veterinarian for a proper diagnosis.

They will take a quick physical exam of your parrot’s nose, and recommend the best course of treatment. 

If your parrot’s nose is completely red and bloody or you’re worried that it might be bleeding inside, consult your veterinarian and get it checked out.

Do not try to treat your bird yourself.

How Long Should I Wait Until I Contact My Veterinarian?

Whether the bleeding is due to an allergy or because your bird is stressed, your bird is not in any immediate danger and is unlikely to die of bleeding if you wait. 

However, it’s a good idea to contact the vet as soon as possible. 

Why Do Parrots Bleed From The Nose? 

Cockatoos and parrots often groom and clean their beaks and nostrils in their cage, and these areas can become easily irritated.

This irritation can cause itchy or bloody noses. 

What does a nosebleed look like in a parrot? 

A normal nosebleed in a parrot will not flow steadily.

Nasal bleeding should be red or pink in color, and it will usually appear right in the center of the parrot’s beak.

A parrot’s nose is often affected by a blood clot (a collection of clotted blood), especially at the top of the bird’s beak or near its nostrils.

Why do birds’ noses bleed? 

It’s usually the result of repeated irritants or sometimes a broken nose.

Parrots, like birds in general, are very sensitive to stimuli.

They have narrow nostrils and have sensitive skin.

Any repeated irritation of this area can cause the blood vessels to rupture.

What Should I Do If My Bird Has a Nosebleed?

An allergic reaction to feathers or dust can cause a bleeding nose and can range in severity from a small amount of bleeding that quickly heals to a nosebleed that you’re unable to stop. 

In most cases, the bleeding stops, and your bird doesn’t seem to be in any pain after a day or two. 

You should continue to monitor your bird’s nose to make sure it’s not bleeding too much.

Wrapping Up

Facial abrasions and bleeding can both be a symptom of many different illnesses in birds. 

Look out for these symptoms in your bird, and you can help them receive the treatment they need.

If you feel that your bird may be suffering from some kind of skin condition, check with your local veterinarian for the right course of treatment.

With anything medical, always talk to your avian and get expert advice