Budgie Biting Other Budgie’s Tail? (Here’s How To Stop It!)

Despite being social birds, budgies can get remarkably possessive or stubborn at times.

So, a budgie chewing at another budgie’s tail can be either him trying to be playful or him marking his territory.

Nevertheless, the precise reason varies among individual birds. 

And this is what we will covering in this article

Let’s get started! 

Why Is My Budgie Biting My Other Budgie? 

It depends on the particular circumstances of your birds, therefore, only you or a vet can accurately identify the underlying cause. 

However, the rule of thumb is:

  1. If your budgie’s feathers are not bent harshly and he doesn’t seem to mind being bitten, then your birds are simply teasing each other. It is usually common among budgies younger than 6 months.
  2. If one of your budgies is picking the feathers of another or chewing them brutally, then it’s probably an issue of dominance. You will see the victim budgie trying to avoid other budgies by staying on the sidelines.

If you recognize a budgie bullying another budgie, immediately separate them before one of your budgies gets severely injured.

Now what about pulling each other’s tails?

What could that possibly mean?

Let’s find out..

Why Do Budgies Pull Each Other’s Tails? 

I know it sounds a bit silly, but budgies bicker quite a lot.

Also, they do need personal space and regular solo time for their mental health.

Usually, a budgie will argue with his fellow birds only for a while.

Though a heated discussion may turn into biting each other, smacking with feet, or pulling out the feathers.

Yet, some budgies find it humorous and they would pull each other’s tails just to have some fun.

Besides, birds tend to groom each other.

So, if you are a first-time bird breeder, maybe you are confusing preening for aggressive behavior.

However, preening does not involve chewing with beaks, but slight grazing with feet or feathers.

Furthermore, budgies have unique personalities.

So, whatever you are witnessing may be unique to your bird alone. But if you are so keen on finding the exact cause, you should consider the following:

1. How Intense is the Pulling?

A playful act of pulling one’s tail will not harm your budgie’s feathers. So, if you see your bird’s feathers getting ruffled or bent cruelly, it’s bullying. 

I suggest you separate your budgies without delay.

2. Is Biting Limited to Tail Feathers?

A budgie bullying another budgie into submission typically attacks the tail feathers. 

But, if one budgie is nibbling at another budgie’s feathers, while the victim bird is not even objecting, then maybe your bird is just itchy. This may be due to pinfeathers or molding. 

3. How Big Is The Birdcage?

In a small cage brimming with birds, a budgie will not get its personal space or freedom to fly around. 

Such a budgie is bound to be cranky and ready to bite anyone getting on its nerves.

That’s why a large bird cage is very important!

You can check out my article for some pretty awesome bird cages

Best large cages for budgies

Here’s a popular bird cage you may like!

Prevue Pet Products Wrought Iron Select Bird Cage Black Hammertone 

4. Are There Enough Containers for Food and Water?

If you have ten budgies and a single pot of clean water, then your birds will have to interact with each other.

Since budgies tend to mark territories, so limited resources may annoy them. And so, your budgie may bite another to claim its territory.

5. Are There Enough Perches and Toys?

Budgies need mental and physical stimulation all the time. If you have a limited number of perches and toys then, your birds are sure to find some other form of entertainment. 

And so, boredom can drive your birds to pull each other’s feathers.

6. Is Your Budgie Stressed?

Stressed birds can go as far as mutilating themselves. Hence, a bird hitting another bird out of stress is no surprise. 

Try to find the source of stress and resolve it. Though, common causes include excessive noise, loneliness, unfamiliar surroundings, malnutrition, and irregular sleep cycles.  

7. Is There a New Budgie in Town?

Whenever you introduce a new budgie to your flock, you risk the new bird to potential bullies. 

So, is the victim budgie the latest addition to your bird family?

If so, you gotta separate that bird for now and re-introduce him later.

8. Are Your Budgies Breeding?

Birds experience hormonal fluctuations during breeding seasons. 

Female budgies get far more aggressive than male budgies and may bite on the slightest hints of annoyance.

Maybe one of your birds is ready to breed while the other is rejecting him over and over. The frustration may lead to a bird physically hitting another bird.

9. Is Your Budgie Sick?

Budgies can sense a sick bird among the flock. So, maybe your budgie is trying to reduce infection within its flock, by shooing away the infected bird.

Now, if a bird can hit another one, you may be thinking:

Can a Budgie Kill Another Budgie? 

As disturbing as it sounds, a budgie can murder another budgie. Though, it seldom happens. 

All birds tend to take extreme measures in the name of long-term good.

This has been observed with birds shoving away their unhatched eggs, or even eating them up, or maybe leaving them to run away from predators.  

Here are a few of the reasons a budgie may kill another budgie:

1. Eliminating Disease

A budgie may step up to condemn a sick bird so that no other bird gets infected within the flock. So, killing a bird is a mandatory sacrifice for the health of all other birds. 

2. Breeding-linked Aggression 

During breeding seasons, if a female bird finds another bird acting as a threat to her eggs, she may go as far as killing that bird. Even if it’s her own mate. 

Furthermore, birds are possessive towards their babies. Therefore, any bird posing a threat to them may be bullied or annihilated.

3. Territorial Claims

Like other animals, budgies also mark territories. If a budgie sees another budgie as a danger to its territory, then he may cross the line by murdering another budgie.

4. New Flock Member

Maybe the new flock member seemed untrustworthy, and so your old budgie deemed it wise to kill the bird before he raises any concerns. 

But if a budgie can murder other budgies, then,

How Do I Stop My Budgies Fighting? 

Since all budgies have distinct habits, so it is difficult to predict when a fight will start. Therefore, you will always have to be mindful of your birds.

Though, you can reduce fights by following these precautions:

1. Large Birdcages

Always buy the biggest cage you can afford. 

This will allow your bird to roam freely without having to interact with other birds.

Thereby, reducing the chances of any conflicts.

Related article – How big should a bird cage be for 2 budgies 

2. Introduction of New Bird

Would you move in with any stranger? Then, why do you think it’s a good idea for your birds?

When introducing a new bird to your flock, I suggest you:

  1. Put the new bird in the same room but in a separate cage for at least 2 weeks. 
  2. Allow them to get familiarized with each other.
  3. Now, shift the new bird to your bird family’s cage.
  4. Stay on alert for any signs of bullying.

3. Increasing Resources

Increase the number of perches, toys as well as food and water containers within the birdcage.

This will ensure that your birds don’t squabble over resources.

Have a read of my article – How many toys does a budgie need in a cage?

5. Reducing Stress

If your budgie is stressed, he may causally start fights.

Therefore, find any stress stimulants and remove them.

This includes putting the cage in a safe area with minimum noise and constant temperature.

Strictly follow a 12-hour-daylight to a 12-hour-dark period for proper sleep cycles.

5. Quarantining the Sick

Isolate and quickly take any of your bird hinting diseases.

5. Investing Time

It is essential that you invest equal time in your budgies, so none of them gets jealous.

Try to spend one-on-one time to form a special bond with your bird. 

You can check out my article – How to bond with your budgie

Wrapping It Up

Budgies are amicable yet naughty birds.

So, a budgie biting another bird can either mean aggression or liveliness.

Since a bird can hurt another, you should always keep an eye on red flags.

Rarely though, but a budgie may end up murdering other budgies.

Therefore, you must try your best to reduce budgie fights.

You may find this article interesting

Why is my budgie kicking my other budgie 

Why does my budgie want to escape

We at birdcageshere.com write about bird health and diet however it should not be taken as medical advice. For advice on your bird you need to seek out an avian vet. The information you find on birdcageshere.com is for educational purposes only. At birdcageshere.com we are not liable for any information that you may find on here. Birdcageshere is NOT a substitute for professional medical advice about your bird.